Frequently Asked Questions
Ordre des ingénieurs du Quebec
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    Frequently Asked Questions

    Scope of practice and competency Open

    Trustee

    Am I required to hire an engineer for the work I wish to carry out?

    The Engineers Act lists the kinds of work that fall within the exclusive practice of an engineer. Section 2 specifies in particular:
    ...the foundations, framework and electrical and mechanical systems of buildings the cost of which exceeds $100,000 and of public buildings within the meaning of the Public Buildings Safety Act (chapter S-3).
    In other words, only an engineer may provide consultations or opinions, make measurements, produce layouts, prepare reports, computations, designs, drawings, plans and specifications or inspect or supervise job sites with respect to the work designated in section 2 of the Act.

    Dangerous work

    The work being performed at my neighbour's place looks very dangerous and I believe it poses a risk to them or to me, my children, my property and my belongings. What can I do?

    Contact your municipality which has the necessary authority to ensure public safety within its territory.

    Mandatory course on professionalism Open

    General information

    This mandatory course is available online on our Web site at www.oiq.qc.ca. You have until May 15, 2013 to pass it. Only members who are registered as retired on the Roll of the OIQ and those who passed their professional examination after September 1, 2011 are exempt from this course.

    Once you have passed the course, it will be entered in your continuing education file and 2.5 hours will be counted toward the minimum requirement of 30 hours for the reference period. Please note that it may take two weeks after you pass the course online for the course to be entered in your file.

    Technical support

    System Requirements

    Click here to know what are the specification needed in order to complete the course.

    Technical issues ?

    The screen stays black and cannot close:
    - Press Escape (ESC) on your keyboard to close the window.

    The button Continue stays locked:
    - All the videos must be seen entirely. You need to let the video play without fast-fowarding before going to the next step. If the button Continue stays locked, it’s because one of the video hasn’t been played entirely.

    A part of the user interface seem missing:
    - Press F11 to put the interface in full screen and/or verify the screen resolution of your computer.

    The videos are loading very slowly:
    - Please make sure that your internet connection is not limited and that your computer meets the minimum requirements as explained above (see Supported Operating System).

    Please note that if you do the course at work, you may experience technical issues related to the limitations of your company’s server access for security reasons. Please contact your computer support to check if they can help you. For any technical problems, feel free to contact us at 1 800 461-6141, ext 2398.

    Business ethics Open

    Ethics

    Can disciplinary offences be cleared over time?

    No. A disciplinary complaint is indefeasible. A disciplinary complaint may be lodged at any time against anyone who committed an offense while a member of the Order. Time lapse may however affect the complainant’s capacity to build a clear and convincing case and that of the respondent to make  "full answer and defence” under natural justice rules. For example, a disciplinary inquiry may be launched regarding a file that has been destroyed by an engineer after the prescribed ten-year retention period. It may however be more difficult to build a case. Why is a disciplinary complaint indefeasible? The disciplinary proceeding is of a public nature. Lodging a complaint against an engineer and imposing penalties aims to  protect the public at large, to discourage the guilty engineer from reoffending as well as discouraging any other trade member who may aspire to commit similar wrongful acts.
     

    Must an engineer comply with the Code of Ethics wherever he or she practices?

    Yes. Each member of the Order is individually liable for complying with the Code of Ethics, wherever he or she may be practicing. Any engineer who carries out professional acts outside of the Province of Québec must comply with ethical obligations. Acts committed outside of Québec shall not lessen any prejudice. Where an act has been committed does not in any way affect the capacity of the Disciplinary Committee to hear and assess a complaint. The Code of Ethics applies to professional conduct not to a specific territory or limited public. By joining the Order, an engineer agrees to be under the control of his or her professional order wherever he or she practices.
     

    I am a member of the Order. May I reject the dates of the meeting proposed by the syndic or refuse to meet with the syndic?

    No. You are under the obligation to meet with the syndic upon request (Prof. C. S. 114 & 122, Code of Ethics of Engineers S. 4.01.01f)). Pleading appointments with other clients or claiming other priorities does not constitute reasonable motive for denying the meeting requested. The syndic may however take into account exceptional circumstances that you will have to explain. Any refusal to meet with the syndic may be deemed as hindering the  inquiry, which may result in a disciplinary complaint and possibly provisional strike-off the roll (Prof. C. S. 130).

    I am a member of the Order. Am I under obligation to answer the syndic's questions?

    Yes, you must answer the syndic’s questions. You cannot mislead the syndic by concealment or false declarations (Prof. C.  S. 114, 122, 192). By refusing to answer, a disciplinary complaint may be lodged against you for hindering the inquiry. You may even be subject to provisional strike-off the roll.  (Prof. C. S. 130).

    I am a member of the Order. Am I under obligation to answer any correspopndance sent by a syndic?

    Yes, you must answer in an expeditious manner any correspondence sent by the Office of the Syndic (Prof. C. S.  114 ; Code of Ethics of Engineers, S. 4.02.02). In failing to do so, you may be the object of a disciplinary complaint or subject to provisional strike-off the roll (Prof. C. S. 130).

    A syndic is asking me for documents. Am I under the obligation to provide them?

    Yes. The Professional Code states that a syndic may demand any and all information or documents relating to the inquiry. The syndic may examine them or require their production and make a copy of such documents (Prof. C. S. 114, 122, 192).

    Is an engineer committing an offense by disclosing confidential information?

    No. Section 192 of the Professional Code explicitly states that a professional may not invoke his obligation to ensure professional secrecy as a reason for refusing to answer a syndic’s request.

    Must an engineer inform the Order only of the main place where he practises his profession?

    No. Under Section 60 of the Professional Code,any professional must elect a professional domicile and so inform the Order. Such professional domicile is the place where the member principally practises his profession. Should the member not be practising the profession, his principal place of employment or place of residence shall constitute the professional domicile. Under Section 60 of the Professional Code a professional must also inform the Secretary of his order of all the other places where he practises his profession, even if only occasionally. Having only a few clients to whom professional services are provided elsewhere does not exempt the engineer from such obligation.

    Must an engineer found guilty of drunk driving advise the Order of the fact?

    Yes. Under combined Sections 45, 55.1 and 59.3 of the Professional Code, a professional must, within ten (10) days of having been so informed, advise the Secretary of the Order that he has been found guilty of a criminal offence, even if such judgment has been rendered by a foreign court. However, in the latter case, the offence for which the professional has been found guilty must relate to an offence, which, if committed in Canada, could have led to criminal proceedings. Consequently, the professional must advise the Secretary if found guilty of driving under the influence, just as for any other judgment relating to an offence under the Penal Code.

    Does an engineer who checks a colleague's work become professionally liable?

    Yes. If each case must be evaluated individually, an engineer who checks a colleague’s work becomes professionally liable. Such liability is not always limited to the allocated mandate, hence the importance of properly determining in writing the scope of one’s mandate. In some cases, the engineer can be held liable not only for the work to be checked but also for any additional element that the engineer knew had to be considered. An engineer must consequently expose any and all noted anomalies, including those outside of his mandate. For example, an engineer who is asked solely to check basic structural analyses cannot not take into account the load rating of the ground on which lies this framework, claiming that it is not part of his mandate.

    The engineer that I have hired did not inform me of the approximate cost of his services and I deem unreasonable the amount billed for these services. What can I do?

    There are several remedies including some that may be exercised concurrently: 1. you can lodge an inquiry request with the Office of the syndic. The engineer was bound by his Code of Ethics to inform you of the extent and terms and conditions of the mandate that you have given him and to obtain your agreement in that respect (Section 3.02.03), to inform you of the approximate cost of his services and of the terms and conditions of payment (Section 3.08.03) and of any changes in this respect. The engineer must also charge and accept fair and reasonable fees (Section 3.08.01 and 3.08.02) and must give you all the necessary explanations for understanding his statement of fees (Section 3.08.04). 2. You may request in writing the conciliation of the bill of costs within sixty (60) days of receiving the bill, even if said bill was paid in part or in full, in accordance with Regulation respecting the conciliation and arbitration procedure for the accounts of engineers. Conciliation could also be requested should a disciplinary decision expressly calls into question the quality or relevance of a professional act charged for (Prof. Code, Section 88) 3. You may also assert your rights under the Québec Civil Code or other applicable law. This remedy is not however under the control of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec. You may make reference to conciliation, mediation or arbitration provisions under your contract with the engineer, if any. This remedy is not however under the control of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec.

    Can an engineer cease to act for the account of a client for no reason?

    No. In this regard, Section 3.03.04 of the Code of Ethics clearly states that “an engineer may not cease to act for the account of a client unless he has just and reasonable grounds for so doing. The following shall, in particular, constitute just and reasonable grounds:
     
    a) the fact that the engineer is placed in a situation of conflict of interest or in a circumstance whereby his professional independence could be called in question;
     
    b) inducement by the client to illegal, unfair or fraudulent acts;
     
    c) the fact that the client ignores the engineer’s advice.“

    Can an engineer refuse to provide a notice of compliance?

    Yes. An engineer cannot be forced to issue and shall not issue a notice or certificate of compliance if he deems that the work does not comply or that compliance cannot be established to his satisfaction, including when work does not comply with applicable laws or rules or with plans or specifications signed and sealed by an engineer, or when information is insufficient to knowingly issue such a notice, a frequent occurrence when the engineer did not supervise the work. It must be specified that only the acting engineer can personally issue such a notice.

    As an engineer, I think that some works constitute a threat to public security. Who should I notify?

    Under Section 2.03 of the Code of Ethics of Engineers, any engineer who considers that some works are a danger to public safety must notify the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec or the persons responsible for such work. This public responsibility is also valid when the engineer is not directly involved in the works. The engineer should first try, as soon as possible, to notify the persons responsible for the work, which could be an employer, the contractor, the owner or the client. Should the engineer be unable to contact a person responsible for the work or if approaching the persons responsible for the work is unfeasible or fails to bring results, or should the engineer opt to remain anonymous, he will contact the Order. The engineer may also try and notify directly competent authorities (such as CSST, the Régie du bâtiment du Québec, a town, a government department or emergency services (911)). Assessing the work as dangerous does not require that the engineer produce an expert report. The engineer may not have the specific knowledge if the work is outside of his field of expertise. The assessment refers more to an estimate or approximate calculation. Finally, if he deems the work a danger to public safety, the engineer must avoid making irresponsible or unnecessary alarming public statements.

    Can an engineer hold on to client-related documents (other than those prepared by him) that are part of his record if the client fails to pay his professional fees?

    In principle no. Where documents not prepared by the engineer are concerned (and not provided by the client), such as a construction permit or letter from the city, the engineer must allow the client to take cognizance of their content and provide him with a copy upon request within the period specified under Section 3.07.01 of the Code of Ethics of Engineers. In this respect, the engineer may charge the client reasonable fees not exceeding the cost of sending, transcribing or copying a document. Whenever the client requests such a  copy, the engineer may hold on to it until the client has paid said transmission, transcription or reproduction fees. The engineer must however provide the client with a copy once the client has paid copying fees, even if this client has not yet fully paid the due professional services fees.

    How long must an engineer keep a client file once his mandate has expired?

    An engineer must keep records for at least ten (10) years. Under Section 2.04 of Regulation respecting the keeping of records and consulting offices by engineers (Sec. I-9, r.13), the engineer’s records must be kept for a minimum period of ten (10) years from the date of the last service rendered or, when the project has been carried out, from the date of the end of the work. The engineer should however be careful before destroying a record. His client may wish to retrieve original documents or other important documents. It might be good practice to always communicate with the client to inquire about his intentions.

    Can an engineer hold on to documents or items provided by the client if said client fails to pay the engineer's fees?

    No. Under Section 3.07.06 of the Code of Ethics of Engineers, the engineer must act with diligence on any written request made by the client to retrieve a document or item which the client has left him. Furthermore, Section 3.07.06 of the Code of Ethics states that the engineer must indicate in that client’s record, as the case may be, the reasons for the client’s request. Section 2.05 of the Regulation respecting the keeping of records and consulting offices by engineers states that where a client withdraws a document from the record which concerns him, the engineer must file a note in the client’s record, signed either by the client or himself, indicating the nature of the document and the date of the withdrawal.

    Can an engineer refuse to hand over plans and other documents prepared by him if the client has not yet paid his professional fees?

    It all depends on the agreement entered into by the engineer and the client and of potential consequences. The engineer cannot refuse to hand over the product of his work to a client who has not paid his professional fees, unless it has been agreed in writing that the engineer’s work would be handed over only after payment of professional fees. This contractual provision cannot however have precedence over obligations under the Code of Ethics of Engineers, including under Section 3.05.01 the engineer’s obligation to subordinate his personal interest to that of his client and under Section 3.03.04, the engineer’s obligation not to cease to act for the account of his client, unless he has just and reasonable grounds to do so. The agreement is subject to compliance with provisions of the Code of Ethics, said provisions being of public policy. Therefore, should holding on to work put the client in a difficult situation or be prejudicial to him, the engineer cannot exercise his retaining right under the agreement at the risk of violating his code of ethics. In the absence of a contractual provision allowing the engineer to hold on to deliverable work under the contract if professional fees are overdue, the engineer must hand over to the client all plans or other documents prepared by him. In case of non-payment of his professional fees, the engineer must hand over his work to the client, submit his professional fee statement and, if need be, file a request with a court of competent jurisdiction.

    Can an engineer carry on his professional activities within a joint-stock company or a limited liability partnership?

    Not unless he can exercise the exception clause under Section 28.1 of the Engineers Act. Since 21 June 2001, the Professional Code allows the constitution of a company, joint-stock corporation or limited liability company for the purpose of providing engineering services solely under the express condition that the Order make a legislative rule in that regard. Such regulation has yet to be made. Section 28.1 of the Engineers Act states that an engineer may carry out his professional activities within a joint-stock corporation, which includes companies, only if that corporation was constituted for that purpose before 21 June 2001. That means that the joint-stock-corporation was operational on that date and already provided engineering services. Consequently, a joint-stock corporation or company constituted before 21 June 2001 but not offering engineering services on that date cannot be used.

    Continuing Education - 1 - General Open

    Who is subject to mandatory continuing education?

    All OIQ members (engineers, junior engineers, engineers-in-training and holders of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit) are obligated to comply with the requirements of the Regulation respecting mandatory continuing education for engineers except for members who have been granted an exemption from the continuing education requirements. To receive an exemption, you must request one in your portal.

    When did the Regulation come into force?

    How many hours of training do I have to take?

    Unless you have been exempted, you must accumulate at least 30 hours of continuing education during the 2-year reference period.
     
    Special cases:
     
    Initial registration
    If you become a member of the OIQ for the first time during the first year of a reference period, you must take at least 15 hours of continuing education.
     
    If you register on the OIQ's roll for the first time during the second year of a reference period, you are not required to take continuing education activities.
     
    Reinstatement
    If you are reinstated on the OIQ’s roll during a reference period, you must accumulate all of the hours specified for the reference period, i.e. a minimum of 30 hours.
     

    Can I be exempted from continuing education?

    Yes. Certain situations warrant your exemption from continuing education. These are the situations that qualify for an exemption request:
    • I am outside of Canada for a period of more than 18 months during the same period.
    • I am enrolled full time in a university program.
    • I have a medical certificate confirming that I have been unable to take continuing education activities for over six months.
    • I am on parental leave in the meaning of the Act respecting Labour Standards (CQLR, chapter N-1.1).
    • I am retired and do not practice the engineering profession.
    • I can prove that I am unable to take continuing education activities; examples of accepted reasons:
        • I am a member who is registered as permanently disabled on the OIQ's roll and does not practice engineering.
        • I act as an informal caregiver for a friend or a relative.
        • I have significantly reduced my professional activities in order to help a friend or relative with a serious illness.

    To receive an exemption, you must request one in your portal.

    Note that members who are unemployed have been struck off the roll or are subject to a limitation or suspension of their professional activities will not receive an exemption for any of those reasons.

    What is a reference period?

    The OIQ defines “reference period” as a period that spans two years for calculation purposes. For instance, a reference period always begins on April 1 and ends on March 31.

    Table of Reference Periods
     
    1st : April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013
    2nd : April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2015
    3rd : April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2017
    4th : April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2019
    5th : April 1, 2019  to March 31, 2021
    6th : etc.

    Do I have to take a minimum number of training hours per year?

    No. There is no minimum number of hours required per year. However, you must accumulate at least 30 hours of continuing education per 2-year reference period.

    Can I complete 30 hours of training in the final year of a reference period or do I have to spread them over 2 years?

    The OIQ does not place any restriction on when you take your training activities. You have 2 years to accumulate at least 30 hours of training. For instance, although we do not recommend this approach, you can take your 30 hours of training in the last month of a reference period and still perfectly meet the requirements of the Regulation.

    Can the OIQ impose a specific training activity?

    Yes. The OIQ's Board of Directors may impose a specific training activity on all members or certain members, due to a legislative or regulatory reform, a major change in standards, or if major deficiencies have been noted that could have negative repercussions on the professional activities of engineers (sec. 4 of the Regulation).

    Is each hour of a training activity equal to one hour of mandatory continuing education?

    Yes. Every hour spent in a continuing education activity may be counted, provided the activity is considered eligible. Breaks are included in the calculation of hours, but not meal times.

    What purpose do CEUs (continuing education units) serve and does the OIQ factor them into its calculation?

    One CEU equals 10 hours of participation in a structured training activity.
    To satisfy the requirements of the Regulation, you must count only the hours of your activities, regardless of the CEUs associated with them.
     
    For more information on CEUs: http://www.sofeduc.ca.

    Can the OIQ provide me with a list of accredited or pre-approved training activities or trainers?

    No. The OIQ does not accredit or pre-approve training activities or trainers. Engineers are responsible for confirming the eligibility of the activities they want to take as regards the requirements of the Regulation.
     
    Note that the OIQ does not pre-approve training activities because its members take a very wide range of activities due to their many different fields of specialty and the multitude of different sectors in which they practice engineering.

    Is the cost of training activities tax deductible for salaried engineers who do not receive support from their employer and have to cover this cost out of their own pockets?

    At the federal and provincial levels, only the cost of training activities provided by recognized educational institutions is deductible for salaried taxpayers.
    To find out which educational institutions are recognized, contact:
     
    - Service Canada: 1 800 622-6232
    - Revenu Québec - Customer service: 1 800 267-6299
     
    Please note: Revenu Québec recognizes the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec as such an institution.

    Is there a tool that can help me plan my professional development?

    Yes. The competency development guide for engineers has been available for reference since December 2008. This guide helps you plan your competency development and, in doing so, enables you to better determine your training needs, set annual competency development objectives and schedule your training activities. It can also help you track your progress in carrying out your plan and assess your competency development activities.

    Who should I contact if I need more information?

    For more information, call us at 514 845-6141 or 1 800 461-6141, extension 2398, or write to sac@oiq.qc.ca.

    I recently graduated and registered on the OIQ’s roll in the middle of the two-year reference period. Which requirement do I have to meet?

    If you become a member of the OIQ for the first time during the first year of a reference period, you must accumulate at least 15 hours of continuing education.

    If you register on the OIQ's roll for the first time during the second year of a reference period, you are not required to take continuing education activities.

    Continuing Education - 2 - Eligible training activities and calculating the hours Open

    Do I need to have the OIQ approve the training activities that I want to participate in?

    No. The OIQ does not pre-accredit or pre-approve training activities because its members take a very wide range of activities due to their many different fields of specialty and the multitude of different sectors in which they practice engineering.
     
    Note that engineers are responsible for confirming the eligibility of the activities they want to take as regards the requirements of the Regulation.

    How do I determine whether a training activity is eligible under the Regulation?

    You must make sure that:
    • the purpose of the activity is to acquire knowledge, skills or attitudes that help you maintain, update, improve or deepen competencies that are related to your professional activities, and
    • the activity falls into one of the categories set out in section 5 of the Regulation. 

    To learn more, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    Important:
    Be careful not to choose so-called informative activities that are intended to convey messages, news or information on a given topic. Their content is rarely covered in sufficient depth. These activities will be considered eligible if you prove that their content provides you with knowledge that allows you to maintain, update, improve or deepen your professional competencies.
    Watch out for ineligible activities:
    • Technical sales presentations may often include a large amount of technical information, but they are not eligible because their primary objective is to market products or services and not to train you.
    • Regular meetings held as part of your job: Although they may be a highly informative for you, these meetings are not eligible because their primary objective is related to carrying out projects or operations.

    How does the OIQ verify the activities and hours?

    Two types of verifications are performed at the end of every reference period to check whether members have met their requirements under the Regulation:
     
    • A quantitative verification is performed on all members subject to the Regulation to check whether they have completed the required number of hours that must be accumulated during the two-year reference period.
    • A qualitative verification is performed on a certain number of members (members who are concerned by the professional inspection program as well as a number of randomly selected members) to check whether:
      • the supporting documentation they have kept matches the information they have reported in their portal, and
      • the content of the training activities they have completed relates to their professional activities.

    Who offers eligible training activities under the Regulation that are likely to be related to my professional activities?

    Besides the OIQ, there are a large number of organizations that offer eligible training activities, including university or college-level educational institutions, technical associations, private training companies and employers. However, since formal courses are not the only eligible training activities, we encourage you to look into the many different types of activities that exist by consulting the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    Is it possible to take training activities that are not held in a classroom?

    Absolutely. The OIQ recognizes a large number of training activities in addition to those that are given in classrooms or in traditional settings. To learn more about the many different types of eligible training activities, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    Are training activities given outside of Québec eligible?

    Yes, provided they are related to your professional activities and are structured in terms of their learning objectives, content and delivery method.

    Does the training absolutely have to be technical in nature or related to engineering?

    No. The Regulation stipulates that the content of a continuing education activity must be related to your professional activities. In other words, the content of an activity must be useful for your work. For instance, an engineer who has to manage teams at work will want to acquire human resource management skills.
    For an overview of the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required to practice the engineering profession and constitute eligible content under the Regulation, we invite you to read the six competencies discussed in the directory of core engineer competencies in the competency development guide for engineers (Guide de développement des compétences de l’ingénieur).

    My employer offers training in the workplace. Can this training be recognized as continuing education?

    Yes, on condition that it is structured in terms of its objectives and content, and is related to your professional activities.
    To learn more about the many different types of eligible training activities, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    “Human resource management” and “communication” are two of the training topics specified in the Regulation. Do training activities with emotional intelligence as their theme fall into these categories?

    Yes, emotional intelligence or mind mapping falls into these categories, provided the content of these activities is related to the knowledge and skills that you must develop for your professional activities. For example, the ability to question yourself and grow, organize your ideas, etc., is considered eligible content.

    Are all presentations on topics related to my job eligible?

    No. To be eligible, a presentation must be aimed at providing you with knowledge that will help you maintain, update, improve or deepen your competencies.
     
    For instance, some presentations are not automatically eligible, such as so-called informative activities, which are often administrative in nature and intended to provide instructions, a progress report or other information on a given subject. Their content is rarely covered in sufficient depth.
     
    To determine whether a presentation is eligible, ask yourself the following questions:
    • Does the content of the presentation make use of my analytical skills and knowledge?
    • Does the content of the presentation give me knowledge that will help me maintain, update, improve or deepen my professional competencies?
     

    Please note: When the OIQ verifies the eligibility of presentations, you will need to be able to prove, using supporting documentation, that the content discussed in the presentations gave you knowledge that you use for your work.

    Here are some examples of ineligible activities:
    • Technical sales presentations: Although they often provide a large amount of technical information, they are not eligible because their primary objective is to market products or services, and not to train you.

    • Regular meetings held as part of your job: Although they may be a highly informative for you, these meetings are not eligible because their primary objective is related to carrying out projects or operations.

    2.1 Participation in courses, conferences, workshops or seminars

    Are hours spent in university activities for credits, such as directed studies, master’s theses and doctoral dissertations, eligible?

    Yes. These hours are eligible at a rate of 15 hours per credit, provided the content of the activity is related to your professional activities.
    To learn more about these activities, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    How are hours spent in a university course counted, given that this type of course requires attendance and time for study and assignments?

    To make it easier to verify training hours in connection with these activities, the OIQ recognizes 15 hours per credit, provided the course content is related to your professional activities.
    To learn more about these activities, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    Is auditing a university course eligible under the Regulation?

    Yes. However, if you do not do the assignments or take the examinations, your transcript cannot be used to prove that you audited the course. Therefore, you must make the necessary arrangements with the professor so that the professor can record your attendance at every session and certify the total hours of your participation at the end of the course.

    Are online courses and webinars eligible?

    Yes, provided that these activities are structured in terms of their learning objectives, content and delivery method.
     
    Please note: Online course or webinar providers must be able to confirm the duration of the activity, as well as the date(s) on which the course was taken and completed by the participant.
    If the online course or webinar that you wish to take meets these criteria, you can report the activity in the “Participation in courses, conferences, workshops or seminars” category.
     
    If the learning activity is more open and less structured, you can take it at your own pace and there is no examination, you can report the activity under the "Participation in research projects and self-study activities” category (maximum 5 hours per reference period).

    What are the rules for calculating the eligible hours of massive online open courses provided by universities (MOOC, or FLOT in French)?

    Members may report the hours they spend in activities that are supervised by professors or the university: As a general rule, these hours are spent watching videos, participating in forums moderated by a professor and performing evaluations. This number may not exceed the provider's estimate of the number of hours/weeks required for participation in the course.

    I am taking a course on the creative process as part of an elementary school and community art education program. Is this course eligible under the Regulation?

    The criterion specified in section 6 of the Regulation for determining the eligibility of an activity’s content is that a connection must exist between the content and the member’s professional activities. In the OIQ’s view, the existence of this connection implies that the activity’s entire content is by nature intended for use in an engineering context or an organizational or project management context that involves an aspect of engineering.
    Based on this view, an activity with content intended for a field other than engineering is ineligible, even if some of the content may be considered transferrable to a member's work. We consider these types of content ineligible because we are unable to evaluate the many factors that determine whether they can be transferred to an engineering or management context.
    Therefore, in our view, a course on the creative process in an arts education program is not eligible under the Regulation because it is meant for a different field than engineering.

    Is an activity given by an individual who is not registered as a business eligible?

    Yes, provided the trainer can prove that he or she has both significant professional experience in the field of the training and relevant expertise as a trainer.
    In such situations, OIQ members must keep a copy of the trainer’s résumé showing that he or she meets these requirements.

    Is the 30-hour Health and Safety on Construction Sites course eligible under the OIQ’s Regulation?

    Yes, the 30-hour Health and Safety on Construction Sites offered by school boards, high schools, professional training centres, trade union federations and employer associations is eligible if it is required as part of your work duties. Note that this course is a pre-requisite to obtaining a certificate of competency, which authorizes its holder to work on a construction site. For more information: http://www.asp-construction.org/default.aspx.

    Are occupational first aid courses eligible under the OIQ’s regulation?

    First aid courses are not eligible if they are not strictly related to your professional activities. However, they are eligible if they are required as part of your work duties, regardless of the reason why they are required.

    Are occupational health and safety courses eligible under the OIQ’s regulation?

    Yes, provided the content of these courses is related to your professional activities.

    Is an individual training course given by a mentor or a coach eligible?

    Yes, but the training course must be structured in terms of its objectives and content, include formal meetings and allow you to learn. Under the Regulation, this type of activity is similar to a workshop and only the hours spent at formal meetings can be counted.
     
    Below is a table showing the relevant information that must be kept for individual training activities (coaching, mentorship, sponsorship), depending on whether you are a participant in this type of activity or a leader of one:
     

     


    PARTICIPANT


    LEADER (coach, mentor, sponsor)

    Type of activity to be reported

    Participate in a workshop

    Give a workshop

    Eligible hours*

    Hours of participation in meetings with the coach, mentor or sponsor

    Hours of meetings given by the leader with the participant

    Ineligible hours

    Time spent preparing for meetings

    Supporting documentation


    Coaching, mentorship or sponsorship agreement + description of the activity content (goals and topics of discussion)

    Certificate of participation in a coaching, mentorship or sponsorship activity specifying the dates and the number of hours of the meetings (signed by the leader)

    Certificate of participation in a coaching, mentorship or sponsorship activity specifying the leader’s name and the dates and the number of hours of the meetings (signed by the participant)

    *There are no limits to the number of eligible hours.

    Are activities such as luncheons (lunch and learns) eligible?

    Yes, provided the activity allows you to acquire knowledge in order to maintain, update, improve or deepen your competencies. In addition, the activity must be structured in terms of its objectives and content and include a period for questions to promote understanding of the topic.

    Are activities such as industrial visits eligible?

    Yes, provided the subject of the visit is related to your professional activities and part of a structured activity in terms of its learning objectives, content and delivery method. For instance, the industrial visit must be in addition to a structured presentation and the activity must include a period for questions to promote understanding of the material.

    How do I calculate the eligible duration of a continuing education activity? Can I count breaks and meal times in the hours?

    You may count only the hours of the training activity itself, including breaks, in your report. This means that the hours you spend at meals, cocktail receptions and any other networking activity may not be counted as continuing education hours.

    When there are no preparatory courses for a certification examination, does the OIQ recognize hours of study aimed at passing the certification examination?

    Yes, provided that the hours of study meet the following criteria:
    • The duration and content have been predetermined by the certifying body, and
    • what you learn is validated by passing the certification examination.

     

    Please note:

    • In the context of the Regulation, certification refers to a written confirmation issued by a recognized body that certifies the level of competency acquired for a given activity, based on pre-established standards and after an individual has passed one or more examinations.

     

    • For the purposes of reporting your hours to the OIQ:
          • This activity corresponds to the following type: Participation in courses given by a specialized institution.
          • The number of hours is set by the certifying body; if that is not the case, members determine the number of hours to report based on this formula: duration of the examination multiplied by a factor of 3 (e.g. 3 hours of examination = 3 x 3 hours = 9 hours of training).

     

    • Members who participate in one or more preparatory courses for a certification examination also report the hours of the course(s) (and keep the certificate of participation as supporting documentation), even if they fail the examination.

    Are graduate-level (master's) and doctoral-level (Ph.D.) studies recognized as continuing education activities?

    Yes. In fact, courses, directed studies and paper-writing activities (e.g. master’s thesis, doctoral dissertation) are eligible. However, their content must be related to your professional activities.
    To learn more about how to count hours and report training activities, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

    2.2 Delivery of a course or a presentation, or leading a workshop or a seminar

    How many hours can I have recognized as a speaker, trainer or workshop leader?

    When you give or lead an activity for the first time: You may count your preparation time and the time you spend giving or leading the activity as follows: up to 3 hours of preparation for each hour the activity given or led, plus one hour for each hour of the activity given or led (excluding meal times).
     
    Example: For a 6-hour course that you have given for the first time, you may report a maximum of 18 hours of preparation. This activity represents a total of 24 hours of continuing education, i.e. 18 hours of preparation + 6 hours of course delivery.
     
    A repeated activity: When you give or lead an activity more than once, you may count only the hours you spend giving or leading the activity.
     
    Updating activity content: If changes are made to at least 50% of the activity’s content, the hours you spend preparing and giving or leading the activity are eligible based on the calculation method shown above (activity given or led for the first time).
     
    Important: When you lead coaching, mentoring or sponsorship workshops, only the hours you spend leading the meetings are eligible since they do not require the same amount of preparation as giving a course or a presentation.

    I spent 10 hours preparing a technical presentation that I gave in January 2014. Can I report the maximum of 10 hours per reference period that applied to this type of activity before the amendments to the Regulation came into force on June 5, 2014?

    You can choose the calculation method that was used before that date if it is more advantageous than the new method.
    The examples below illustrate the options available to you.

    Examples of activities completed before June 5, 2014:

    • A member spent 10 hours preparing a one-hour presentation that he gave for the first time on June 3, 2014. He may choose the most advantageous calculation method of the following two:

     

    Previous method
    (method used before the amendments came into force)

    New method
    (method used after the amendments came into force)

    Actual preparation time (i.e. 10 hours) + actual presentation time (i.e. 1 hour); category limited to 10 hours per reference period; the member spent a total of 11 hours on this activity, but he may report only 10 hours due to the limit that was set.

    3 hours of preparation time per hour of presentation (i.e. 3 hours) + actual presentation time (i.e. 1 hour); the member may report 4 hours.

    The member may choose the previous method.

     

    • A member spent 30 hours preparing a six-hour course that he gave for the first time on May 14, 2014. He may choose the most advantageous calculation method of the following two:

       

      Previous method
      (method used before the amendments came into force)

      New method
      (method used after the amendments came into force)

      Actual preparation time (i.e. 30 hours) + actual course delivery time (i.e. 6 hours); category with a maximum of 10 hours per reference period; the member spent a total of 36 hours on this activity, but he may report only 10 hours due to the limit that was set.

      3 hours of preparation time per hour of course delivery (i.e. 18 hours) + actual course delivery time (i.e. 6 hours); the member may report 24 hours.

      The member may choose the new method.

      2.3 Drafting specialized articles or papers, provided they are published

      Can the hours I spend drafting a specialized article or paper be counted as a continuing education activity?

      Yes, provided the specialized article or paper is a document that discusses elaborate content and is published with the goal of improving the knowledge of a large audience in an area related to practicing the engineering profession.
      The criteria that must be met:


      • Goal: Improve the knowledge of a large public in an area related to practicing the engineering profession.
      • Publication of the text: Only published texts are eligible. “Published” means that an article or a paper is intended to be made public or published on a physical, electronic or virtual medium by an external publisher or a professional association.
      • Review of the text: The process of drafting the article or specialized paper must include a stage in which it is reviewed by a panel of qualified individuals.


      The following are excluded:
      • Technical documents such as operating instructions, maintenance guides and any type of report drafted as part of regular work activities
      • Documents distributed for internal use or reviewed exclusively by the author’s employer


      You may count the hours you spend preparing and drafting a specialized article or paper as follows: 1 hour of training for each section of 500 words completed.
      Example: If you write a 2,500-word article, 5 hours are eligible for that activity. If the text has 2,400 words, then 4 hours may be counted.

      Several engineers helped draft, publish or update an article or specialized paper: Can all of us obtain mandatory continuing education hours?

      Yes. In addition to meeting the abovementioned criteria, each of you may report a number of hours by applying the calculation rule (1 hour per section of 500 words completed) to the sections of the article or paper that he or she wrote alone or co-wrote.

      Can I count the hours I spend drafting a promotional text as a continuing education activity?

      Drafting a promotional text, even if the text provides a wealth of information, does not fall in to the “Drafting specialized articles or papers” activity category specified in the Regulation.

      In fact, for a drafting activity to be eligible, the article must not only be published, but also have the primary objective of transferring knowledge for the purposes of improving competencies.

      Consequently, drafting activities aimed at promoting a product or service are not eligible under the Regulation.

      Please also note that any readings you may have done to prepare the article with the goal of improving your knowledge on a given topic may be eligible. In that regard, the Regulation allows you to accumulate up to 5 hours of self-study per reference period.

      Can I count the hours I spent drafting a patent application as a continuing education activity?

      No, since drafting a patent application is considered a work activity and the readings required to draft the application, even if you acquired knowledge from them, are not eligible under the Regulation.

      Please also note that any readings you may have done to prepare your patent application with the goal of improving your knowledge on a given topic may be eligible. In that regard, the Regulation allows you to accumulate up to 5 hours of self-study per reference period.

      I spent 10 hours preparing and drafting a 1,000-word specialized article published on January 3, 2014.Can I declare them in full despite the changes in the regulations in June 2014?

      You can choose the calculation method that was used before that date if it is more advantageous than the new method. The examples below illustrate the options available to you.


      • A member spent 7 hours preparing and drafting a 1,000-word specialized article published on June 3, 2014. He may choose the most advantageous calculation method of the following two:

       

      Previous method
      (method used before the amendments came into force)

      New method
      (method used after the amendments came into force)

      Actual preparation and drafting time (i.e. 7 hours); category limited to 15 hours per reference period; the member may report 7 hours.

      Preparation and drafting time of 1 hour per section of 500 words (i.e. 2 hours); the member may report 2 hours.

      Note: The member may choose the previous method.

       

       

      • A member spent 120 hours preparing and drafting a 20,000-word specialized paper published on June 3, 2014. He may choose the most advantageous calculation method of the following two:

       

      Previous method
      (method used before the amendments came into force)

      New method
      (method used after the amendments came into force)

      Actual preparation and drafting time (i.e. 120 hours); category limited to 15 hours per reference period; the member spent a total of 120 hours on this activity, but he may report only 15 hours due to the limit that was set.

      Preparation and drafting time of 1 hour per section of 500 words (i.e. 40 hours); the member may report 40 hours.

      Note: The member may choose the new method.

      2.4 Participation in technical committees

      As a member of a technical committee responsible for reviewing a standard and improving practices in our field, I conduct research and perform analyses in preparation for our meetings. Are the hours I spend doing this eligible?

      No, because the committee's mandate is to ensure that all newly installed equipment complies with the set requirements.
      A technical committee with a formative character is eligible under the Regulation, provided its work concerns the professional activities of participants and its discussions are aimed at improving their practice. For example, committees whose participants are tasked with preparing a guide to best practices, a profile of competencies or a standard (and update them) in connection with their practice are eligible because they are clearly attempting to improve their professional activities through their discussions.

      As a member of a technical committee responsible for reviewing a standard and improving practices in our field, I conduct research and perform analyses in preparation for our meetings. Are the hours I spend doing this eligible?

      Yes. Hours of research and analysis may be reported as self-study activities (maximum of 5 hours per reference period).
      However, the hours of participation in committee meetings are more recognized due to the value they bring to the discussions and experience sharing between participants. Therefore, they are fully counted.

      As a volunteer and out of personal interest, I participate in the work of a technical committee active in an area not related to my professional activities. Are my hours of participation in this committee eligible?

      No. To be eligible, the content of the activity–in this case, the technical committee's mandate–must be related to your professional activities.

      I participate in the work of a technical committee that provides an administrative framework for certain engineering works. Are the hours I spend in this committee’s meetings eligible as a continuing education activity?

      Given the definition of a “technical committee” found in section 5 of the Regulation, only the hours spent on mandates aimed at improving the professional activities of participants are eligible. Preparing guides to best practices, competency profiles or technical standards (and updating them) is an example of a mandate aimed at improving professional activities.
      Therefore, when determining the number of hours that you will report for your participation in the technical committee, you will need to exclude the hours of discussions for other purposes, such as administrative follow-ups and member coordination.
      As concerns supporting documentation that proves your participation in such an activity, you will need to keep documents that specify the committee’s mandate, the minutes of the meetings and examples of the deliverables that improve the professional activities of the participants.

      2.5 Participation in research projects and self-study activities

      Are self-study (or self-learning) activities eligible training activities?

      Yes, if this type of training is related to your professional activities. For the OIQ, a “self-study activity” means an activity that you carry out alone with the goal of improving your knowledge and skills without the assistance of a trainer or instructor or independent verification of the dates and duration of the activity (for example: reading specialized articles or papers; carrying out technical exercises related to your field of practice; viewing video or online presentations; taking courses via DVDs, tutorials, etc. that let you learn at your own pace).
      Under the Regulation, the maximum number of hours recognized for this type of training activity is 5 hours per reference period.

      Why are self-study activities limited to a maximum of 5 hours per reference period?

      The OIQ chose the 5-hour limit primarily because the Office des professions du Québec recommends a continuing education framework that gives priority to learning supervised by trainers and other formats (e.g. online training, guest speakers, workshops, etc.) and limits the hours spent on self-study.
      Another reason for the limit is the OIQ’s selected regulatory approach: a low minimum standard of just 30 hours of continuing education to be accumulated over 2 years. This standard is one of the lowest adopted to date in Québec. Due to this fact, the OIQ had to limit the hours spent on self-study activities. The 5-hour limit seems all the more reasonable to us given that a different order, i.e. the Barreau du Québec, selected a similar minimum standard, but does not recognize self-study at all.

      Are structured training activities completed at our own pace with a tutorial or a DVD eligible?

      Yes. However, since an independent verification will not be performed to confirm the date(s) on which the activity was carried out and completed, these activities are considered eligible as self-study activities and are limited to a maximum of 5 hours per reference period.

      Is a pedagogical training activity eligible?

      Yes, provided that it is part of your professional activities, you carry out the activity as an engineer and its content is related to one or more fields of engineering.

      Continuing Education - 3 - Specific Situations Open

      As a junior engineer or an engineer-in-training, am I required to take continuing education activities?

      All members of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec are required to take continuing education activities, whether they are junior engineers, engineers-in-training or engineers. Only members who have obtained an exemption for the reasons stipulated in the Regulation are full or partially exempted from this requirement.
      For complete information about the exemptions, consult the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      I asked to be removed from the OIQ's roll a few years ago, and I would now like to be reinstated, but it is the middle of a reference period. Which requirement do I have to meet?

      If you are reinstated on the OIQ's roll during a reference period, you must accumulate all of the hours specified for the reference period, i.e. a minimum of 30 hours.

      I am registered on the OIQ's roll, but I stay at home to take care of a sick family member. Which requirement do I have to meet?

      You may obtain a total or partial exemption from your continuing education requirements if you act as an informal caretaker on a full-time basis.
      For more information, consult the Summary Table of Exemptions (reason 6) and, if applicable, log in to your portal  and request an exemption (“Exemption request – continuing education” tab).

      I am registered on the OIQ’s roll, but I am unemployed. Which requirement do I have to meet?

      This situation is not an eligible reason for obtaining an exemption from continuing education.

      I am registered on the OIQ's roll but I am unemployed because I stay at home to take care of my children. In addition, I do not plan to go back to work for five or six years. Which requirement do I have to meet?

      This situation is not an eligible reason for obtaining an exemption from continuing education.

      I am on maternity leave, sick leave, delayed leave or another type of leave or I went back to school. Am I exempted?

      Certain situations warrant your exemption from continuing education. To find out the full list of eligible reasons for an exemption and the process for obtaining one, refer to the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      I am an engineer who works outside of Canada. Do I have to comply with the Regulation?

      It all depends on the length of your stay abroad. If, during the same reference period, you work over 18 months outside of Canada, you can request an exemption. However, you must fulfil your continuing education requirements if your project spans a period of less than 18 months.

      My right to practice professional activities has been restricted or suspended. Do I have to comply with the Regulation?

      Yes. Your restricted or suspended right to practice professional activities is not a valid reason for exemption; the same applies if you have been struck off the roll.

      I have been temporarily struck off the OIQ's roll. Am I automatically exempted from taking continuing education activities?

      No. Being struck off the roll is not a valid reason for exemption; the same applies if your right to practice professional activities is restricted or suspended.

      I am both a lawyer and an engineer, but I practice law. Do I have to comply with the OIQ’s Regulation? If so, are the hours of training that I spend on legal topics eligible?

      On the one hand, as a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec, you are required to fulfil your continuing education requirements.
      On the other hand, since the Regulation requires training activities to be related to your professional activities and you do not practice engineering, the OIQ will in your case recognize training activities that are related to your capacity as an engineer. For example, the hours you spend reviewing construction law cases in 2014 would be considered eligible under the Regulation adopted by the OIQ.
      The OIQ will also recognize the hours you spend in training activities aimed at acquiring the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to practice the engineering profession. To obtain an overview of these topics, we invite you to read the six competencies discussed in the directory of core engineer competencies in the competency development guide for engineers (Guide de développement des compétences de l’ingénieur).

      I am at the end of my career and have been asked to share my expertise with young people. Do I have to comply with the Regulation?

      Absolutely. Unless they are exempted, all members are required to comply with the Regulation respecting mandatory continuing education for engineers. This could be an opportunity to take a course on intergenerational transfer techniques, mentorship, coaching, etc.
      However, the hours you spend leading structured meetings, in which you transfer your expertise to young people, are eligible under the Regulation. For more information on this topic, refer to the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

      I have been registered on the OIQ's roll for 45 or more years. Am I exempted from the continuing education requirements?

      No. All members are required to comply with the Regulation respecting mandatory continuing education for engineers. Only members who have obtained an exemption for the reasons stipulated in the Regulation are full or partially exempted from this requirement. For complete information about exemptions, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

      Continuing Education - 4 - Specific Situations: Questions concerning retirement Open

      I am currently registered as a “retired member” on the OIQ’s roll. What requirement do I have to meet?

      You have the option of being exempted from the continuing education requirements if you request this when you fill out the application form for retired member status on the OIQ’s roll.
      To obtain this status, you must meet the following three conditions:
      • You must be currently retired (have no employment income).
      • You have been registered on the OIQ’s roll for a number of years that, when added to your age, is equal to or higher than 80.
      • You have been registered on the OIQ’s roll, in one or more member categories, uninterrupted for the five years prior to the year in which you apply for “retired” status.
       
      Please note:
      • Members who obtained retired member status on the roll before the amendments to the Regulation came into force in June 2014 were automatically exempted from the continuing education requirements. They did not need to request exemption.
      • Since June 2014, members have been granted an exemption on grounds of retirement based on the following definition: “They are retired and do not practice the profession.”
      • Therefore, since June 2014, members who wish to obtain or even maintain their exemption from continuing education on grounds of retirement must meet the condition of not practicing the engineering profession.
       
      For the English version of the application form for retired member status, click here.

      I am “semi-retired” and practice the profession occasionally. Am I exempted from the continuing education requirements?

      No. A member who practices the profession, even occasionally, must comply with the requirements of the Regulation and accumulate continuing education hours.

      I retired in February 2016 and no longer practice engineering. However, I plan to work part time. Am I exempted from the continuing education requirements?

      Yes, you may be exempted from the continuing education requirements if you meet the conditions for retired member status under the Regulation and if you no longer practice the profession.
      To qualify for retired member status under the Regulation, you must meet the following conditions:
      • You have ceased or reduced your professional activities due to your age, i.e. with the goal of ending your working life.
      • You no longer hold a full-time engineering job (30 or more hours per week on a regular basis or over 1,560 hours per year).
       
      Retired members who satisfy these conditions and do not practice the engineering profession may request an exemption from continuing education by taking the following steps:
      • During annual registration periods (February and March of every year): Report that they are retired and do not practice engineering when they register.
      • Outside of annual registration periods: Follow the instructions that apply to their situation.

      I am currently registered as a retired member on the OIQ’s roll and am exempted from continuing education. An employer has asked me to work on a project for two months; if I accept this project, do I have to take training activities?

      Yes, if the project involves acts that fall within the scope of the engineering profession. A member who practices the profession, even occasionally, must comply with Regulation and accumulate continuing education hours.
      The number of hours that you will need to accumulate will be calculated on a prorated basis from the remaining hours in the reference period when you accept the project, at a rate of 1.25 hours per month.
      Example: You accept a project on September 1, 2017. Since 19 months remain in the 2017-2019 period (April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2019), you will need to accumulate 23 hours of continuing education during that period (19 remaining months x 1.25 hours per month).
      Important: You will need to wait until the beginning of the following reference period (April 1, 2019) to be exempted again from your continuing education requirements as a retired member who does not practice the profession.

      Continuing Education - 5 - Specific Situations: Exemptions Open

      Are there situations where members can be exempted from taking continuing education activities? If so, how long will the exemption last?

      Yes. Some situations may qualify for an exemption. Examples: You are retired and no longer practice the engineering profession; you submit a medical certificate confirming that you have been unable to take training activities for over six consecutive months; or you are on parental leave in the meaning of the Act respecting Labour Standards, etc.
      As for the scope of the exemption, it will vary depending on the duration of the situation you cite to justify the exemption. Exemptions are calculated on the following basis: 1.25 hours of exemption per month of the situation cited to justify the exemption.
      To find out the full list of eligible reasons for an exemption and the process for obtaining one, refer to the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      Is there an exemption request form?

      To request an exemption, you must fill out the form on line in your portal. Click on the “Exemption request – continuing education” tab and follow the procedure. 
      For complete information on valid reasons for an exemption and the supporting documentation that must be submitted, refer to the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      The situation causing my exemption request will continue in the next reference period. Will I need to submit a new exemption request for the same situation at the beginning of the next reference period?

      To warrant an exemption for a stay of over 18 months outside of Canada, the stay must fall entirely within the same reference period. The exemption granted is calculated and valid only for the period in progress. In other words, if your situation spans more than one reference period, you will need to submit a new exemption request for each period concerned. However, if your profile specifies that the address of your domicile is outside of Canada, your exemption will be renewed automatically for the next reference period.
      As for the other reasons, the situations that qualify for exemptions may straddle two reference periods. In such cases, only one request must be submitted and the exempted hours are calculated for each period concerned by the situation.
      In any case, if the situation that qualified you for an exemption ends before the exemption period granted by the OIQ ends, or in the opposite case, if the situation continues, you must IMMEDIATELY notify the OIQ by sending an e-mail to sac@oiq.qc.ca so that your file can be updated.

      I am on sabbatical leave. Can I obtain an exemption?

      Although this is not one of the eligible reasons stipulated in the Regulation for granting an exemption, you may submit an exemption request if you feel that a situation prevents you from taking training activities and you can justify this. The OIQ will analyze your situation and contact you when it has made its decision.
      To request an exemption, log in to your portal, click on the “Exemption request – continuing education” and follow the steps.

      5.1 I am outside of Canada for a period of more than 18 months during the reference period

      I am outside of Canada. What do I need to do to request an exemption?

      You can submit an exemption request along with supporting documentation proving that you have been or will be outside of Canada for a period of more than 18 months during the reference period.
       
      Examples of accepted supporting documentation:
      • a copy of your employment contract
      • a letter from your employer that specifies the length of your stay outside of Canada
      • If you are outside of Canada for a reason not related to your work, you can include a proof of residence outside of Canada. Examples: a permanent resident card, an electric or telephone bill that includes your name, the address of your residence and dates confirming that you were outside of the country for more than 18 consecutive months (e.g. bills for April 2015, June 2016 and March 2017).
      To request an exemption, log in to your portal, click on the “Exemption request – continuing education” and follow the steps.

      I work outside of Canada for 12 months and then come back for a period of 2 months to Canada before returning abroad for another 12-month period. Can I request an exemption?

      The accumulation of non-consecutive stays totaling over 18 months within the same reference period qualifies for an exemption.
      To request an exemption, log in to your portal, click on the “Exemption request – continuing education” and follow the steps.

      5.2 I am enrolled full time in a university program

      I am enrolled full time in a university program. The Regulation stipulates that I may be exempted from its requirements. Should I report the hours of training I have completed or request an exemption?

      If you are enrolled full time in a university program during the reference period, you have two options:
       
      Option 1: Prepare a continuing education report if your studies are related to your professional engineering activities.
      If you choose this first option, you need to report the courses that you take and successfully complete to the OIQ. It is more flexible than option 2 (where you submit an exemption request) and allows you to fulfil the requirements of the Regulation.
       
      Option 2: Submit an exemption request if your studies are not related to your professional engineering activities (e.g. medical or law program).
       
      To learn more about the exemptions granted for full-time university studies and the supporting documentation that you must submit with your request, refer to the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      5.3 I have a medical certificate confirming that I have been unable to take continuing education activities for over six months

      I am on sick leave. What do I need to do to request an exemption?

      You can submit an exemption request as soon as you are unable to take continuing education activities due to an illness of more than six months.
      This six-month period may straddle two reference periods. In such a case, the exempted hours are calculated for each period concerned.
       
      Your exemption request must be accompanied by a medical certificate which confirms that you are unable to take continuing education activities due to an illness and specifies the start and end dates of the period of time concerned by your inability to do so. In the event of an indefinite period of time, the dates of the next medical follow-up appointments are required.
      You can also obtain this certificate from your physician using the form for that purpose.

      5.4 I am on parental leave in the meaning of the Act respecting Labour Standards (CQLR, chapter N-1.1)

      I am on parental leave. Am I exempted from taking continuing education activities?

      Yes, if you are on parental leave in the meaning of the Act respecting Labour Standards (ALS) of Québec. A parental leave lasts for a maximum of 52 weeks, as stipulated in section 81.10 of the ALS.
      To learn more about the exemptions granted for parental leaves (exemption calculation, required supporting documentation, etc.), refer to the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      I am self-employed and on parental leave. Am I exempted from taking continuing education activities?

      A self-employed worker on parental leave for a maximum of 52 weeks may obtain an exemption, just like any other worker.

      I plan to stay at home for several more years to take care of my children but will keep my OIQ membership. Am I subject to the Regulation?

      Yes, you are subject to the Regulation.

      5.6 I can prove that I am unable to take continuing education activities

      I have decided to stay at home to take care of a sick relative. Am I exempted from taking continuing education activities?

      You may obtain a total or partial exemption from training if you act as an informal caretaker on a full-time basis. To learn more, consult the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      My husband/spouse is seriously ill and I have reduced my workload considerably so that I can take care of him/her. Am I exempted from taking continuing education activities?

      If you are unable to take continuing education activities because a friend or family member is seriously ill, you can obtain a partial exemption from training. To learn more, consult the Summary Table of Exemptions.

      Continuing Education - 6 - Activity report and supporting documentation Open

      Do I have to notify the OIQ every time that I take a training activity?

      No. The Regulation gives you until May 31, which is the end of a reference period, to submit your continuing education report for that period. However, the OIQ strongly encourages you to:
      • report the hours of training you take as you complete them, and
      • report all of the hours of training that you have taken, including those that you complete in addition to the 30 hours required.
      That way, you will have an up-to-date overview of all the efforts you have made to develop your competencies.
       
      To learn more about how to calculate the eligible hours per type of activity, consult the Summary of Continuing Education Activities.

      What is the procedure for reporting my continuing education activities?

      You must report your continuing education activities in your portal, in the “Continuing education report” tab.
       
      You must keep supporting documentation confirming that you have truly taken these training activities for two years after the end of each reference period.
       
      The OIQ encourages you to upload your supporting documentation in your portal, when you report your activities.
       
      To learn more about the supporting documentation required per type of activity, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

      Do I have to report my training activities every year or wait for the reference period to end?

      You report your activities in your portal (“Continuing education report” tab) as you complete them or as frequently as you like. In any case, you have until May 31 following the end of a reference period to complete your continuing education report for that period.
       
      The OIQ encourages you to:
      • report the hours of training you take as you complete them, and
      • report all of the hours of training that you have taken, including those that you complete in addition to the 30 hours required.

      Do I have to wait until I have passed the certification examination to report my hours of participation in preparatory courses to the OIQ?

      No. A long period of time may elapse between the beginning of the courses and the examination. This process may even straddle two reference periods. As a result, the OIQ processes these activities (preparatory courses and examination) independently and considers your hours of participation in preparatory courses to be eligible regardless of when the examination takes place or whether you pass it. However, participants must ask the certifying body to issue them a certificate confirming their participation.

      Do I need to systematically submit a continuing education report, regardless of my member category?

      All members must fill out their continuing education report in their portal (“Continuing education report” tab) except:
      • members who obtained an exemption for the entire duration of the reference period, and
      • members who have no continuing education hours to accumulate because their first registration on the OIQ’s roll occurred during the second year of a reference period.

      What are the deadlines for submitting a continuing education report?

      You have until May 31 following the end of a reference period to submit your continuing education report. For example, you had until May 31, 2017 to comply with this requirement for the reference period ending March 31, 2017.
       
      However, the OIQ encourages you to:
      • report the hours of training you take as you complete them, and
      • report all of the hours of training that you have taken, including those that you complete in addition to the 30 hours required.
      That way, you will have an up-to-date overview of all the efforts you have made to develop your competencies.

      Do I have to submit supporting documentation confirming that I actually took the training activity with each report?

      You can choose one of the following two options:
      • You can submit your supporting documentation with your report to the OIQ (option recommended by the OIQ; accepted files: pdf, jpg, png, gif).
      • You can keep them in your own filing system.
       
      In any case, you must keep the supporting documentation for a period of two years following the end of the reference period, in case the OIQ asks you for it. During that period, the OIQ may require you to provide it with any information or document that it can use to verify whether you have actually satisfied the requirements under the Regulation.
       
      To learn more about the required supporting documentation, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

      What types of supporting documentation are eligible?

      First, any document or information that provides details on the training activities you have taken: their duration, content and date(s), the name of the organization that provided them, etc. It may also be a copy of a specialized article or paper that you have written.
      Second, any document which confirms that you have taken an activity or even successfully completed it, where applicable.
      To learn more about the required supporting documentation, consult the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

      How and when do I have to report the training activities that I have taken during the reference period to the OIQ?

      You have until May 31 following the end of a reference period to report your continuing education activities in your portal on the OIQ’s Web site. Your report specifies the continuing education activities that you have taken during the reference period, their content and the number of hours accumulated.
      However, the OIQ encourages you to report your activities as you complete them in order to satisfy this requirement.
       
      You must also keep supporting documentation confirming that you actually took these training activities by uploading it in your portal (recommended option) or keeping it in your files.
       

      What will happen if I do not accumulate the required 30 hours of continuing education?

      When you do not complete the required 30 hours of training, it means that you have failed to satisfy the requirements and are in default. You will receive a first notice and, if the situation continues, a second notice enjoining you to correct the situation. If you still do not complete the required 30 hours of training, you will be struck off the roll of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec. To find out more on this topic, refer to the Notice of default and regularization section.

      Can I be struck off the roll if I do not comply with the Regulation respecting continuing education?

      Yes. You will be struck off the OIQ's roll if you do not fulfil your continuing education requirements. To learn more about this topic, refer to the Default and sanctions section.
      To find out more on this topic, refer to the Notice of default and regularization section.

      What is the required procedure for reporting hours of training activities that straddle two reference periods to the OIQ?

      This example shows you how to report an activity that straddles the 2015-2017 and 2017-2019 periods. The same logic applies to any activity that straddles two periods, whatever the periods.
       
      Two situations are possible:
      1) If the training activity includes an evaluation based on a passing grade (e.g. university courses for credits), the eligibility of the training hours is conditional upon the successful completion of the activity (passing grade). When reporting their hours, members take into account the date on which they completed the evaluated work, exercise or examination that determines whether they have successfully completed the activity. If the date is April 1ST, 2017 or after, members report all of the hours of this activity in the 2017-2019 reference period.
      Note: Then, members who have not accumulated the number of hours required during the 2015-2017 reference period can follow the instructions provided to transfer the number of hours they lack from the 2017-2019 period to the 2015-2017 period in order to correct the situation.
       
      2) If the training activity does not include an evaluation based on a passing grade, the training hours are eligible simply because members participated in the activity, subject to proof of their participation. In that case, members report their hours in the appropriate reference periods according to the dates of the activity.

      How can I transfer hours from the period in progress to a previous period in order to correct a default situation?

      Here are the steps that you should take after reporting your training activities for the period in progress:
      • Click on the icon  pointing to the activity(ies) in red in the period in progress that may be used to regularize your situation.
      • Carefully read the instructions and, if you so desire, transfer the hours to the previous reference period in which you failed to accumulate the required number of hours.
       
      Important: The number of transferable hours factors in the maximum limit of 5 hours per reference period applicable to the “Participation in research projects and self-study projects” activity category and, where applicable, the hours that you have already reported for this type of activity in the period concerned.

      Continuing Education - 7 - Questions concerning employers Open

      As an employer, do I have to pay for training activities that my engineer employee takes to comply with his or her requirements?

      No. The Regulation does not set out any requirement that employers must cover the cost of these training activities. However, the OIQ strongly encourages employers to do so because they are the ones who primarily benefit from the services rendered by the engineers they employ. In Québec, this procedure is also governed by the Act to Promote Workforce Skills Development and Recognition.

      As an employer, do I have to report to the OIQ?

      No, employers do not have to report to the OIQ. Only your employees who are members of the OIQ are required to do so.

      As an employer, how can I support my employees in meeting their requirements?

      • Guide de développement des compétences de l'ingénieur (Guide to competency development for engineers) to determine their training needs, set development goals and schedule the activities that will help them reach their goals;
      • covering the cost of the training activities;
      • gathering information and documents which confirm that the engineers concerned have actually completed the training activities (dates of the activities, types of activities, content, number of hours completed, etc.) throughout the reference period;
      • keeping supporting documentation (certificates of participation, diplomas, certificates, etc.) during the two years that follow each reference period; and
      • making sure that the trainers and organizations that train your employees provide you with documents confirming their participation.<

      Can the costs incurred to attend OIQ training activities be counted in the 1% of the payroll expenses that companies must invest in training?

      Yes, these costs are eligible, as specified on pages 20 and 21 of the guide to eligible training costs published by the Commission des partenaires du marché du travail.
      Please note: The professional orders governed by the Professional Code of Québec do not have a certification number. They are automatically certified.

      Continuing Education - 8 - Questions concerning trainers and training organizations Open

      Does the OIQ plan to accredit trainers, training organizations or training activities?

      No. The OIQ does not plan to accredit trainers, training organizations or training activities. As a result, members have a greater selection of training opportunities.

      Can OIQ members receive a special rate for the training activities they take with certain organizations?

      To date, the OIQ has not established any partnerships with training organizations or trainers; therefore, it is up to the organizations and trainers to offer special rates to its members.

      In our advertisements, how should we refer to the OIQ’s Regulation?

      Since the OIQ does not accredit trainers, training organizations or training activities, your advertisements may not state that your trainers or organization are recognized by the OIQ.
       
      You may, however, indicate that your training activities are eligible under the Regulation when their content is related to the professional activities of OIQ members (article 6).
       
      For more information, refer to the Summary Table of Continuing Education Activities.

      Annual subscription Open

      Annual registration

      Who can register on line?

      All OIQ members can register on line.

      Is the on-line registration and payment process secure?

      Yes, once you have logged in to the On-line services section of the OIQ, you will be in a secure environment. Generally, a Web site is encrypted if the Web address contains the letters "https://" and if the locked padlock symbol appears in the lower right hand corner of your browser.

      Your transaction is secure because:
      • All transaction-related information is sealed.
      • Data falsification protection is built into the system.
      • Credit card information is subject to encrypted transmission.
      • Protection is provided against Internet-based data interception.
      • Transaction and payment information stored on the transaction server is protected.
      • Card status is always verified. Card numbers that are reported lost, stolen or non-existent are immediately blocked.

      During a financial transaction, information such as your credit card number and expiry date are sent to an authentication body for the purposes of authorization. No information pertaining to your credit card is retained on the OIQ servers.

      Do I have to register on line?

      If you do not complete the registration process on line, you can mail us the paper annual registration form, which must be ordered in advance. If you choose to register with the paper form, you will be charged an administrative fee and will need to mail us the duly completed, signed and dated "Annual Registration" form along with a cheque for the fees.

      You can obtain the documents in French or English by writing to the Customer service Department at sac@oiq.qc.ca or calling 1 877 845-6141, ext. 2473. We will send you the documents according to your preference.

      What is the deadline for my annual registration and payment?

      You must submit your documents and payment by no later than March 31.

      The Board of Directors will strike from the roll of the OIQ the names of all OIQ members who have not fulfilled their annual registration obligations within the allotted period of time, i.e. no later than March 31. Members must pay the full amount owed for annual registration. If your name is struck from the roll of the OIQ, it means that you are no longer allowed to use the title of Engineer or the abbreviation of this title and practice the profession. Once your name has been struck from the roll, you may submit a request to reinstate it. However, please note that in addition to your annual assessment, you will also be charged a reinstatement fee equal to 50% of the annual assessment.

      If I decide not to register, what should I do?

      You should send us the “Request for Withdrawal from the Roll” form available on the OIQ Web site under “Media and documentation” / “Publications” / Category: “Annual Registration.” This form should be sent by e-mail to sac@oiq.qc.ca, by fax to 514 845-6141 or by mail to the Customer service Department.

      What are the consequences if I decide not to register?

      If you decide not to register, you will no longer be allowed to use the titles "engineer," "junior engineer," "engineer-in-training," or the abbreviations "Eng.," "Jr. Eng.," "EIT,", or any name, title or designation that might lead to the belief that you are an engineer or a member of the OIQ. Likewise, you will no longer be allowed to practice the engineering profession in Québec, subject to the penalties provided by the Act. Furthermore, please note that once your name is removed from the OIQ's roll, you will no longer participate at the group professional liability insurance plan. With regards to the group life insurance plan with Manulife Financial, we invite you to communicate directly with them to verify if you are still eligible.

      If you have worked as an engineer in private practice in Québec or in connection with Québec, you are required to comply with the obligation set out in the applicable legislation of maintaining a valid professional liability insurance policy for five years after your last engineering act in private practice. We also ask that you notify your clients and employer that you are no longer a member, where applicable.

      In addition, junior engineers who do not register will not be able to gain recognition for any experience they acquire as non-members. However, this does not affect engineers-in-training.

      Unless you were employed by a physical or legal entity, company or government, you are also required to comply with the Regulation respecting the cessation of practice of a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec when you cease to practice your profession (available on our Web site www.oiq.qc.ca). You must fill out a form if that is your situation.

      What information should I enter if my job has ended?

      If you have lost or quit your job, or have retired, you must enter the date on which your job ended. You must also enter the appropriate type of activity for your current situation, i.e. "unemployed," "student", "retired," etc. You can edit your contact information at any time in your profile in the On-line services section of our Web site by clicking on the “My portal” button.

      How much time do I have to inform the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec of my new contact information?

      The OIQ must be notified within 30 days of any change of contact information. All members must provide the address of their primary workplace as well as that of all other places of practice.

      The recent changes I made to my information on line have not yet been validated by the OIQ. Can I still complete my registration?

      Yes. You must declare that your contact information is accurate subject to any changes you may have made.

      Can I modify my contact information through the “Annual Registration” tab?

      Yes. However, if you leave the registration form before you have completed it, the information you entered will not be saved. You will have to start the registration process over from the beginning and return to the “Annual Registration” tab.

      Where can I receive e-mails from the OIQ?

      You can receive e-mails from the OIQ at your choice of e-mail address, such as your home e-mail address or the e-mail address that you use at your primary workplace. You can edit your correspondence preferences at any time in your profile in the “On-line services” section of our Web site by clicking on the “My portal” button.

      What is the professional domicile?

      All members must elect their professional domicile, which is primarily used when the Disciplinary Council or Board of Directors must publish a decision concerning a member. Such notices include the name and professional domicile address of the member in question. According to section 60 of the Professional Code: “A professional shall elect domicile by informing the secretary of the order of which he is a member of the place where he principally practices his profession or, if he does not practice, his place of residence or principal place of employment, within 30 days after he begins to practise; the domicile thus elected shall constitute his professional domicile. He must also inform the secretary of all the other places where he practises his profession.”

      I practice in two places and I am asked to select a single professional domicile, either my primary workplace or my other place of practice. Why?

      According to the Professional Code, “A professional shall elect domicile by informing the secretary of the order of which he [or she] is a member of the place where he [or she] principally practices his [or her] profession…” Depending on your case, you could principally practice the profession of engineer in either one of these places of practice.

      Why do I have to provide the name of the engineer who is supervising and directing my work?

      Junior engineers, engineers-in-training or holders of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit may only engage in professional activities reserved under the Engineers Act if they are under the immediate supervision and direction of an engineer (professionally speaking).

      Can I complete my registration if I don’t know the member number of the engineer who is directing and supervising my work?

      We ask for the member number of the engineer who is directing and supervising your work to facilitate identification, which is why it is preferable to include it. However, if you can’t get this number, simply provide the engineer’s name.

      What is "occasional private practice" in accordance with the Regulation respecting professional liability insurance for the members of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec?

      Members who render professional services alone and for their own account for fees equal to or less than $10,000 for all projects they complete during a year (March 31 to March 31 in the following year) engage in occasional private practice of the engineering profession and are therefore covered by the basic group professional liability insurance plan of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec. The concept of “alone and for their own account” applies to members who practice in their own name or through a sole proprietorship, and not in partnership or for a legal person (e.g. an incorporated company).

      However, junior engineers, engineers-in-training or holders of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit may only perform professional activities reserved by the Engineers Act under the immediate control and supervision of an engineer (professional guidance and supervision). They are not covered by the basic group professional liability insurance plan (occasional private practice) when they provide services that are reserved for engineers since they do not practice alone and are required to subscribe to the group supplementary professional liability insurance plan.

      Furthermore, members who receive more than $10,000 in fees for all projects they complete during a year must subscribe to the group supplementary professional liability insurance contract entered into by the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec by contacting the OIQ's exclusive broker. They cannot be covered by the basic group professional liability insurance plan.

      To find out the details of the basic group professional liability insurance plan of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec, please read the insurance policy, which can be found on the OIQ's Web site (www.oiq.qc.ca) under "Media and documentation” / “Publications" in the Category: "Professional liability insurance.”

      Members who occasionally practice engineering in private practice (moonlighting) must declare one place of practice for their occasional private practice. This place of practice could be, for example, their place of residence.

      What does the term private practice mean?

      Under the second paragraph of section 3 of the Regulation respecting professional liability insurance for members of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec, a member is working in private practice if he renders professional services for his own account, or for the account of another member or partnership, to clients that are not his employer. The fields concerned by this definition are mainly those of the kinds of works and acts set out in sections 2 and 3 of the Engineers Act.

      Members are usually considered to be working in private practice when:
      • they work for a consulting engineering firm;
      • they provide professional engineering services to an external clientele (e.g.: self-employed consultants, building and other inspectors, members who work in an analytical laboratory and any other expert who gives advice on works of the kinds that constitute the field of practice of an engineer).

      The insurance contract may be held by members themselves or by the company that employs them. However, the obligation of being insured lies with members; in the event that their employer does not subscribe to insurance that complies with the Regulation on their behalf, members are required to do so.

      Does the OIQ’s basic group plan cover me if I work in private practice?

      No. The basic group insurance plan does not cover private practice (consulting engineering). For that reason, members who practice engineering in private practice must also take out professional liability insurance that complies with the Regulation respecting professional liability insurance for members of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec. The basic group professional liability insurance plan for OIQ members provides coverage:

      • for general practice;
      • for occasional private practice, i.e. moonlighting (certain conditions apply);
      • and after the five-year period in which members who worked in private practice are required to maintain coverage for the acts they performed in private practice.

      Do engineers who work in private practice outside QC and exclusively for clients outside QC on projects that are entirely carried out, built or manufactured outside QC have to take out a prof. liability ins. contract that complies with the OIQ's reg.?

      No. These engineers, however, must make sure that they comply with the legal framework for practicing in the jurisdiction where they work.

      In addition, engineers must have insurance coverage that meets the requirements of the jurisdiction where they provide professional services, as necessary.

      What is the minimum coverage required by the OIQ’s regulation for all professional liability insurance contracts of members who work in private practice?

      The minimum coverage amounts provided for an individual who works alone in private practice are $500,000 per loss and $1,000,000 for all losses during the coverage period. However, these minimum coverage amounts are $1,000,000 per loss and $2,000,000 for all losses during the coverage period in the event that the insurance is taken out by a member or a company (partnership) for members whom it employs or who are directors, officers, shareholders or partners.

      I work in private practice and plan to retire or cease practicing. Do I still have to keep my professional liability insurance coverage?

      Yes. For at least five years after the last act you performed. However, the premium paid for the supplementary plan covers members against any professional liability claim that may be filed against them in the five years after they provide their final service. Therefore, when members who are covered by the supplementary plan cease to work in private practice, they do not have to continue to pay a premium for the next five years.

      If I am an employee of a consulting engineering firm, do I have to have my own professional liability insurance coverage?

      No, you are not required to take out your own insurance if the company that you work for has insurance coverage complies with the Regulation respecting liability insurance for members of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec that covers you for the professional services you render. However, the obligation of being insured lies with members. Therefore, in the event that your employer does not take out insurance for you that complies with the Regulation respecting liability insurance for members of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec, you are required to do so.

      Some time ago, I was an employee of a consulting engineering firm. Am I automatically covered for the 5-year period that follows my departure from that company?

      Not necessarily. For every year of those 5 years, engineers are responsible for checking with their former employers to make sure that they are actually covered by their former employer’s contract. However, the premium paid for the supplementary plan covers members against any professional liability claim that may be filed against them in the five years after they provide their final service. Therefore, if their former employer subscribed to the supplementary plan, the members’ acts will still be covered for five years and they will not have to continue to pay a premium for the five years after they ceased to work in private practice.

      I already have a professional liability insurance plan for the services I render in private practice. Do I have to pay the premium for the basic group professional liability insurance plan?

      All OIQ members, except members who qualify for the lifetime member status (a status that has not been granted since 1993) and the permanently disabled member status, must pay the premium for the basic group professional liability insurance plan. This payment must be made as part of the annual registration process.

      I was found guilty for impaired driving. Do I have to declare that during the annual registration process?

      Yes. As required by the Professional Code (section 59.3), you have to declare any criminal offence of which you have been found guilty.

      I am currently being prosecuted for a criminal offence. Do I have to declare this even though I have not been found guilty?

      No. However, if you are eventually found guilty, the Professional Code (section 59.3) requires you to notify the Secretary of the OIQ within ten days of the date on which you were informed of the decision.

      I was found guilty of a criminal offence that I believe is not in any way connected to the practice of the profession. Do I have to notify the Secretary of the OIQ of this?

      Yes. The Professional Code (section 59.3) requires members to declare any decision rendered by a court that finds them guilty of a criminal offence. The Board of Directors will determine if there is a connection with the profession and the administrative or disciplinary measures that may be required, as needed.

      I have to answer “yes” to one or more of the declarations (judicial or disciplinary): What documents do I have to provide to the OIQ?

      You must submit the appropriate document for your situation, i.e. the “Criminal Offence Declaration Form,” the "Disciplinary Decision Declaration Form” or the “Penal Decision Declaration Form,” which are available on the Web site (www.oiq.qc.ca) under “Media and documentation” / “Publications” / Category: “Annual Registration,” as well as a copy of the requested documentation (criminal information, judgment), etc.)

      I was the subject of a judicial or disciplinary decision stipulated in the Professional Code a long time ago (not last year) and I did not declare it. Do I have to declare it now?

      Yes. Any judicial or disciplinary decision stipulated in the Professional Code must be declared to the Secretary of the OIQ within ten days of the date on which you were informed of the decision.

      Are the confirmations and declarations that I make on line the same ones as those that I will have to make on the paper registration form?

      Yes. A false declaration, failure to report information or the submission of false, altered or fraudulently obtained documents may result in disciplinary sanctions.

      What payment methods are accepted for on-line registration?

      You may pay by credit card, direct payment through a banking institution (Web-based payment), or by cheque.

      Which credit cards are accepted?

      Visa and MasterCard.

      What is direct payment?

      Direct payment through a banking institution involves making your payment through your banking institution’s Web site. Only Web-based payments will be accepted. Payments cannot be made via ATM or over the counter at your banking institution.

      How can I make a direct payment over the Internet?

      Direct payment is a two-step process. First, note the invoice number on the invoice issued when you complete the registration process on line. Then, proceed to your banking institution’s Web site to pay the invoice. Go to the bill payment section and select “ORDRE DES INGÉNIEURS DU QUÉBEC” from the list of available payees.

      Which banking institutions provide this service?

      You can pay your invoice on the Web sites of the following banking institutions:

      • National Bank of Canada
      • Bank of Montreal
      • Royal Bank of Canada
      • TD Canada Trust
      • Caisse Populaire Desjardins
      • Scotiabank
      • CIBC

      Can I pay at an ATM or over the counter at my local bank?

      No. You cannot pay this invoice at your local bank.

      Can I pay by cheque?

      Yes. You can complete your registration on line, print the invoice at the end of the on-line registration process and return it with your cheque by no later than March 31 to the address below. Do not forget to write your member number on your cheque.

      Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec
      Windsor Station, Suite 350
      1100 avenue des Canadiens-de-Montréal
      Montreal, Quebec H3B 2S2

      I am a junior engineer or engineer-in-training. Why am I required to pay full assessment?

      Junior engineers and engineers-in-training do not pay annual assessment the first time that they register. The second time that they register, they pay a prorated amount of dues based on the number of months that have elapsed since the date of their first registration on the membership roll. The prorated amount of dues is calculated so that junior members pay no dues for one full year. However, junior engineers who have been registered for less than a year still have to pay the OPQ contribution and the group professional liability insurance premium. After their first year, they must pay the full amount of annual assessment in addition to the other amounts mentioned above.

      Can my employer pay my annual assessment?

      Your employer may pay your annual assessment for you. However, you must make sure that you complete the annual registration process, print out a copy of the “Summary” page and give it to your employer. This page includes a detailed invoice. Then, your employer has to send the copy of that page and your payment to the OIQ. Please note that is your responsibility to make sure that your employer sends the payment to us by no later than March 31.

      What are the eligibility conditions for "retired" status?

      To be eligible for "retired" status, you must meet the following conditions:

      • Be currently retired (zero employment income).
      • Have been entered on the roll for a number of years that when added to your age equals to or greater than 80.
      • Have been entered on the roll, without interruption, under any combination of membership categories, for the five years preceding the year in which you apply for "retired" status.

      I am retired. Why was I invoiced as a regular member?

      Retired status is not assigned automatically. If you meet the eligibility conditions for retired status (see above) and wish to be entered on the roll as such, you must take the following steps:

      • Fill out and return the “Application form for retired member status ” available on the OIQ Web site under “Media and documentation” / “Publications” / Category: “Annual Registration” by e-mail to sac@oiq.qc.ca so that we can change both your status and the amount of your invoice;
      • You may then register on line.

      What if, over the course of the year, I no longer meet the eligibility requirements for retired status?

      If at some point during the OIQ's financial year (April 1 to March 31), you no longer satisfy the requirements for being entered as retired on the roll, you will have to pay the difference between the annual assessment you paid and the full dues. This difference is not pro-rated.

      I already have a professional liability insurance plan for the services I render in private practice. Do I have to pay the premium for the basic group professional liability insurance plan?

      All OIQ members, except members who qualify for the lifetime member status (a status that has not been granted since 1993) and the permanently disabled member status, must pay the premium for the basic group professional liability insurance plan. This payment must be made as part of the annual registration process.

      Why does my invoice have a zero on the line for the supplementary assessment?

      The $0 amount displayed on this line is shown for the purposes of transparency.

      Am I required to pay the contribution to the Office des professions du Québec (OPQ)?

      Yes. All members of the OIQ without exception must pay a contribution to the Office des professions du Québec (OPQ).

      What is the Office des professions du Québec?

      The Office des professions du Québec (OPQ) sees to it that each professional order ensures the protection of the public.

      Accordingly, the OPQ:

      • ensures that the orders have the appropriate means to fulfill their mandate;
      • advises the government on how the professional system can be continuously improved;
      • oversees amendments to the laws that regulate the professional system;
      • promotes efficiency in the procedures established by the orders;
      • ensures that the public is informed and represented within the orders.

      When can I expect to receive my receipts?

      Once the cashing of the payment is done, you can access your official receipts any time in the On-line services section of our Web site under the tab “Receipts and declarations”.

      How do I get a membership card?

      To obtain a membership card, you will have to pay the fee. Then, you will have to fill out and return the “Bon de commande pour carte de membre et permis” form available only in French on the OIQ Web site under “Media and documentation” / “Publications” / Category: “Forms.” Juniors engineers, engineers-in-training and holders of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit cannot obtain one. Please also note that membership cards do not constitute proof of registration on the roll of the OIQ.

      What are the consequences if I decide not to register?

      If you decide not to register, you will no longer be allowed to use the titles "engineer," "junior engineer," "engineer-in-training," or the abbreviations "Eng.," "Jr. Eng.," "EIT,", or any name, title or designation that might lead to the belief that you are an engineer or a member of the OIQ. Likewise, you will no longer be allowed to practice the engineering profession in Québec, subject to the penalties provided by the Act. Furthermore, please note that once your name is removed from the OIQ's roll, you will no longer participate at the group professional liability insurance plan. With regards to the group life insurance plan with Manulife Financial, we invite you to communicate directly with them to verify if you are still eligible.

      If you have worked as an engineer in private practice in Québec or in connection with Québec, you are required to comply with the obligation set out in the applicable legislation of maintaining a valid professional liability insurance policy for five years after your last engineering act in private practice. We also ask that you notify your clients and employer that you are no longer a member, where applicable.

      In addition, junior engineers who do not register will not be able to gain recognition for any experience they acquire as non-members. However, this does not affect engineers-in-training.

      Unless you were employed by a physical or legal entity, company or government, you are also required to comply with the Regulation respecting the cessation of practice of a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec when you cease to practice your profession (available on our Web site www.oiq.qc.ca). You must fill out a form if that is your situation.

      Is there a reinstatement fee?

      Yes. A reinstatement fee equal to the half of the annual assessment, plus tax, will be charged in addition to your annual assessment.

      I paid for reinstatement on the roll of the OIQ. However, you sent me a tax receipt for less than the full amount of my payment. Why?

      The amount you paid for reinstatement included the reinstatement fee, which is equal to the half of the annual assessment, and not tax deductible.

      If I wish to be reinstated after an absence of several months or several years, what steps should I take?

      To be reinstated, you must send a duly completed and signed copy of the annual registration form and pay the dues for the current year, as well as a reinstatement fee equal to the half of the annual assessment, plus tax. If you have been absent from the roll of the OIQ for a period of more than three years, you must also submit a résumé and your file will be forwarded to the Practice Supervision Department. This is the procedure currently used by the OIQ. However, the conditions for reinstatement may be subject to change without prior notice.

      For more information :

      For more information, please call the customer service Department of the OIQ at 1 877 845-6141 and select one of the following extensions:

      In this text, the term “member” refers to an engineer, a junior engineer, an engineer-in-training and a holder of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit.

      Annual Registration (more)

      Why was a "Consents" section added to the registration process?

      This consent request is made in accordance with the Act respecting access to documents held by public bodies and the protection of personal information, the Act respecting the protection of personal information in the private sector, and Canadian anti-spam legislation which came into force on July 1, 2014. We would like to take the opportunity provided by the annual registration process to ask you to reconfirm your choices. If you have already answered the consent request, you can change your answers if you wish. However, your consent is required again for two of the items because their wording has changed (networking activities and mutual funds). Finally, if you have not already answered the consent request, this is your opportunity to do so.

      Why do you have to ask for my consent?

      We have to ask for your consent so that we may disclose your personal information to third parties and send you any message that is commercial in nature.

      Can I change my choices later?

      Yes. You can change your choices at any time in your "On-line services" profile on the OIQ's Web site by clicking on "My portal" button.

      How do I determine whether I practice engineering?

      All members must declare it if they practice engineering. The field of practice and the acts that constitute engineering practice are set out in sections 2 and 3 of the Engineers Act.

      What does "due to their age, have either ceased or reduced their professional activities” mean? Is there a minimum age at which members can be considered retired engineers under the Regulation respecting continuing education for engineers?

      The Regulation does not stipulate a minimum age for retirement. The OIQ considers members retired when they have ceased or reduced their professional activities with the goal of ending their working life, the period of their lives in which they spend most of their time on their career and work.

      Is it still necessary to have retired member status on the OIQ's roll to be exempt from the continuing education requirements?

      No. Since June 5, 2014, not only engineers with retired member status on the OIQ's roll, but all retired engineers, regardless of their status on the OIQ’s roll, may be exempted from the continuing education requirements. However, the exemption granted to these engineers is only valid if they do not practice engineering.

      To be considered retired members under the Regulation, members must meet the following criteria:
      • have ceased or reduced their professional activities due to their age;
      • not have a full-time job (30 or more hours per week on a regular basis).

      Since February 2nd, 2015, retired members who meet these conditions and do not practice engineering may request an exemption from the continuing education requirements in their profile or during the annual registration process of the OIQ from the “My portal” section of the OIQ’s Web site.

      I am a holder of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit, so why do I have to pay the full annual dues?

      For their first annual dues payment, holders of a temporary restrictive engineer’s permit pay a prorated amount that varies according to the number of months remaining in the year ending. For their second annual dues payment, they pay the full amount.

      What does "ceased or reduced their professional activities to less than 30 hours per week on a regular basis" mean?

      Generally speaking, this means that members must have worked less than 1,560 hours during a year.

      Why do I have to provide you if I plan to perform a professional activity (1) in the next 12 months or if I have performed a professional activity (1) in the last three years in some fields?

      The OIQ invite you to specify your fields of practice in order to improve the knowledge of OIQ member’s practice..

      (1) Performing a professional activity means, for example, providing an opinion, preparing a report, making calculations, executing plans and specifications, carrying out a study, attesting to compliance.

      Why do I have to indicate if I would be available to act as a sponsor and help a junior engineer?

      The OIQ is looking for volunteers who are willing to support certain members in their professional development. Members who show interest by answering “yes” will be contacted as needed.

      The Sponsorship Program is an optional activity in which junior engineers may participate during the Junior Engineer Program. This program is designed to help junior engineers successfully enter the profession by allowing them to converse with an experienced volunteer engineer about the rights and obligations inherent in the status of an engineer and the fundamental values of the profession, which are competence, responsibility, ethics and social commitment. Sponsorship involves a series of six meetings lasting a minimum of 75 minutes each.

      Furthermore, the Engineer who is sponsoring the Junior Engineer will also obtain a continuing education credit of 7.5 hours once the Sponsorship Program has been completed to the full satisfaction of the OIQ.

      Why do I have to indicate if I would be available to act as a tutor and help a member who is subject to a restricted right to practice?

      The OIQ is looking for volunteers who are willing to support certain members in their professional development. Members who show interest by answering “yes” will be contacted as needed.

      For the purpose of protecting the public, when the Executive Committee feels that an engineer does not possess sufficient competencies to provide quality professional services in a specific field, it may sometimes require that engineer to take refresher training. In such a case, another engineer may act as a tutor and supervise a fellow engineer whom the Executive Committee has required to complete a practical training period as part of the refresher training. This supportive measure is intended to help the engineer regain the full right to practice in his or her desired field.

      Due to the work he or she performs in supervising a fellow engineer, an engineer who acts as a tutor may be credited with continuing education hours once the refresher training has been completed to the full satisfaction of the OIQ.

      I have been the subject of a legal recourse (Lawsuit, Originating application) that has been brought against me or that I have declared to my insurer since April 1, 2015. Do I have to declare that during the annual registration process?

      Yes. Section 62.2 of the Professional Code stipulates that “a professional must, in accordance with the terms and conditions determined by the board of directors, inform the order of which he is a member of any professional liability claim against him filed with his insurer and of any notice of loss he files with his insurer with respect to professional liability.”

      Accordingly, the Board of Directors of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec requires its members to declare all legal recourses (lawsuits or originating applications) that have been brought against them or that they have declared to their insurer since April 1, 2015. To comply with this requirement, members must:

      • inform the OIQ during the annual registration period, from February 1 to March 31, of all legal recourses by answering the question referring to the declaration of legal recourses (lawsuits or originating applications) that have been brought against them or that they have declared to their insurer with respect to professional liability insurance;

      • inform the OIQ at the latest 30 days of the notification of any legal recourse (lawsuit or originating application) that has been brought against them or that they have declared to their insurer with respect to professional liability insurance.

      I have to answer “yes” to the declaration of legal recourses professional liability insurance: What documents do I have to provide to the OIQ?

      You must submit the “Legal Recourse Declaration Form concerning Professional Liability Insurance” as well as a copy of the lawsuit or original application. This form is available on the OIQ’s Web site (www.oiq.qc.ca) under “Media and documentation” / “ Publications” / Category: “Annual registration”.

      Does the requirement to declare legal recourses brought against members or that they have declared to their insurer since April 1, 2015 also concern legal recourses brought or declared against a company (joint-stock partnership)?

      No, only legal recourses (lawsuits, originating applications, etc.) concerning members must be declared.

      Recourses and decisions Open

      Access to Information

      I would like to know if an engineer has been the object of disciplanry measures. Can I obtain such information by contacting the Office of the Syndic?

      No. Any request to know if an engineer has been the object of disciplinary measures must be submitted to the Order’s Disciplinary Council. Disciplinary decisions have been made public since August 1988.

      I would like to know if an engineer is under inquiry. Can I obtain such information by contacting the Office of the Syndic?

      No. Such a request for information may be submitted in writing to the syndic of the Order. The syndic however has full discretionary powers to deny any request, to refuse sharing information or a document that may bring to light the content of an inquiry or affect a current or upcoming inquiry or one that may be reopened.

      Dissatisfaction with the services of an engineer

      The engineer that I hired has not completed his assignment and I want him to refund the money that I already paid to him. What should I do?

      Contact the General Department of the Order to request account mediation within 60 days of the date the account is received.

      Claims

      May I anonymously report an engineer's professional misconduct?

      Yes, you may anonymously report to the Office of the Syndic any professional misconduct by an engineer. You may do so in person, by phone or by email. The individual who makes such a report is deemed an informer. Such a report must include enough relevant and personal information so that the syndic may undertake an inquiry. The individual who submits an official inquiry request to the Office of the Syndic may ask, once clearly identified in said request, to remain anonymous. Anonymity cannot however be guaranteed should a disciplinary complaint be lodged with the Disciplinary Council. Identity of the requestor may be disclosed should failure to do so adversely affect the right of the engineer to a full answer and defence.

      What are the required conditions for the syndic to launch an inquiry?

      1. The syndic can only inquire about an offense committed by an individual who was then a member of the Order, whether or not said individual remained a member of the Order after the fact.
       
      2. The syndic cannot “go on a fishing expedition” based on vague or summary allegations that prevent it from identifying and investigating a potential offense and individual under its jurisdiction. An inquiry request must therefore include enough information so that the syndic may conduct an inquiry.
       
      3. In principle, any conduct targeted by an inquiry request must be associated with professional activities. Acts of a private matter, to the extent that they are closely linked to the profession and are the source of a scandal that could compromise the honour or dignity of said profession, may exceptionally be investigated by the syndic. An inquiry request may therefore be rejected if not linked in any way to professional activities or capacity.

      What kind of follow-up may I expect after requesting an inquiry by the Office of the Syndic?

      The Office of the Syndic acknowledges receipt of an inquiry request within days of said request. The file is then assigned to the syndic or an assistant syndic who is responsible for this inquiry. Conducting an inquiry requires time, sometimes months. You will be informed in writing, through a progress report, if a syndic fails to conclude its inquiry within 90 days of receiving the request. The syndic will then issue a new progress report  every 60 days. The syndic will not however report progress to an individual of informer status or one who simply reported an event.

      Why should the syndic wish to meet with me?

      A syndic conducts an investigation after receiving an inquiry request or relevant information. The purpose of this inquiry is to determine if an individual, who was a member of the Order at the time of the event, has violated, once or on several occasions, the Professional Code, the Engineers Act or related regulations. The syndic tries and confirms the validity of stated allegations or reported information. Any individual who might help the syndic learn facts or assess the overall situation, through relevant information or documents, may be met during such an inquiry.

      Is the syndic under the obligation to inform a member of the Order of the motives for requesting a meeting?

      No, there is no provision that requires informing an engineer of reasons why a syndic wishes to meet him or her or informing the engineer of the source of the allegations or information obtained. Furthermore, there is no provision requiring that an engineer be informed that he or she is the subject of an inquiry or that the inquiry relates to a specific file or files. Finally, the syndic does not have to inform the engineer of the date that they will meet at the engineer’s office or elsewhere. However, the syndic may, at its discretion and only if it does not hamper the inquiry, make an appointment with the engineer and briefly inform him or her of the motives of such meeting or inquiry.

      A syndic wants to meet with me. How long will that meeting last?

      A meeting may last half an hour or several hours. It may even take place over several days. Each case is different and the duration will vary based on complexity of the issue and of the inquiry, on the level of collaboration of the individual met, questions asked, organization, etc.

      Can other individuals be present during my meeting with a syndic?

      Not usually, including for reasons of confidentiality. The syndic shall decide.  A lawyer, a second syndic, an expert or any other individual may however assist the syndic (Prof. C. 121.2).

      Can my lawyer be present during my meeting with a syndic?

      Under Article 122.2 of the Professional Code, the individual who requests that an inquiry be conducted may be assisted by another individual, at any step of said inquiry. The Professional Code grants that right to no one else that the syndic may wish to meet with during the inquiry. Needless to say, anyone may consult a lawyer to learn about his or her rights and obligations in regards to inquiry proceedings.

      I am a member of the Order. May I reject the dates of the meeting proposed by the syndic or refuse to meet with the syndic?

      No. You are under the obligation to meet with the syndic upon request (Prof. C. S. 114 & 122, Code of Ethics of Engineers S. 4.01.01f)). Pleading appointments with other clients or claiming other priorities does not constitute reasonable motive for denying the meeting requested. The syndic may however take into account exceptional circumstances that you will have to explain. Any refusal to meet with the syndic may be deemed as hindering the  inquiry, which may result in a disciplinary complaint and possibly provisional strike-off the roll (Prof. C. S. 130).

      I am a member of the Order. Am I under obligation to answer the syndic's questions?

      Yes, you must answer the syndic’s questions. You cannot mislead the syndic by concealment or false declarations (Prof. C.  S. 114, 122, 192). By refusing to answer, a disciplinary complaint may be lodged against you for hindering the inquiry. You may even be subject to provisional strike-off the roll.  (Prof. C. S. 130).

      I am a member of the Order. Am I under obligation to answer any correspondance sent by a syndic?

      Yes, you must answer in an expeditious manner any correspondence sent by the Office of the Syndic (Prof. C. S.  114 ; Code of Ethics of Engineers, S. 4.02.02). In failing to do so, you may be the object of a disciplinary complaint or subject to provisional strike-off the roll (Prof. C. S. 130).

      A syndic is asking me for documents. Am I under the obligation to provide them?

      Yes. The Professional Code states that a syndic may demand any and all information or documents relating to the inquiry. The syndic may examine them or require their production and make a copy of such documents (Prof. C. S. 114, 122, 192).

      Is an engineer committing an offense by disclosing confidential information?

      No. Section 192 of the Professional Code explicitly states that a professional may not invoke his obligation to ensure professional secrecy as a reason for refusing to answer a syndic’s request.

      I have recently met with a syndic. What are the next steps?

      The syndic will conduct his inquiry. In so doing, the syndic shall meet as many people or collect as many documents as he sees fit. He may therefore contact you to get specifics or ask to meet with you again. The syndic will then examine all collected information before rendering a decision. The syndic may, based on circumstances an data collected, decide to lodge a complaint before the Disciplinary Council, to forward the request to the Professional Inspection Committee or recommend conciliation. The syndic shall inform the person who requested the holding of an inquiry of his decision. The syndic will also, in general and although not required to do so, inform the engineer who is the object of the inquiry (Prof. C. S. 123).

      Can an engineer sued for damages by a client be the object of a disciplinary complaint for the same facts?

      Yes. Civil liability remedy and a disciplinary complaint are two distinct remedies.

      Trustee

      Can I personally file a disciplinary complaint against an engineer?

      Yes. You have two choices. You can ask the syndic of the Order to investigate an engineer or you can directly lodge your complaint with the Order's Disciplinary Council.

      Recommending an engineer Open

      Recommending an engineer

      Can the Order refer an engineer?

      No, but we can tell you if an engineer is listed on the roll of the Order, and if that engineer has ever been the subject of a disciplinary decision or penalty or of a restriction of his right to engage in professional activities.

      Use of the title Open

      Use of the title

      What are the rules of use for the title of engineer?

      For questions about the use of the title, see chapter "Professionnalisme, éthique et déontologie" of the Guide de pratique professionnelle.(available in French only)

      Gare Windsor, bureau 350
      1100, avenue des Canadiens-de-Montréal
      Montréal (Québec) H3B 2S2

      1 514 845-6141
      Toll free : 1 800 461-6141